WiFi Continues to Shape the Enterprise Small-Cell Space

Ed Gubbins

Ed Gubbins

Summary Bullets:

  • Recent trends illustrate how influential WiFi remains in the enterprise small-cell space.
  • Small-cell vendors must align their view of technologies, partners and competitors with this dynamic.

As RAN vendors continue with an attempt to kick in the door to the enterprise small-cell market, one of the primary dynamics influencing these efforts is WiFi’s dominance in enterprise environs. This is largely what led Cisco to use its WiFi market footprint to compete in the small-cell space, of course. But, even in late 2015, after years of driving the enterprise small-cell value proposition, some players are shifting their thinking toward an even greater respect for the importance of WiFi in this business. For example: Read more of this post

The Value of Name-Dropping Reliance Jio

David Snow

David Snow

Summary Bullets:

  • Suddenly, ‘a very large unnamed Asian operator’ has started to be claimed in vendor discussions on product scalability.
  • Reliance Jio, the new Indian mobile broadband entrant, provides contracted vendors with one of the best available product and functionality references.

Current Analysis is well known for its ‘speeds and feeds’ vendor product comparisons. Though that’s far from all that we do, in developing and validating such comparisons, we engage in frequent discussions with vendors. One example is about product scalability. In these discussions, vendor responses to a question regarding whether product ‘x’ can scale to parameter ‘y’ often take on a mosaic of proof points, including references to data sheets, testing exercises (in-house, independent or carrier), named carrier contracts, etc. Read more of this post

AT&T, vCPE and Vendor Differentiation – Can’t Say We Didn’t See This Coming

Peter Jarich

Peter Jarich

Summary Bullets:

  • AT&T’s recent “Network on Demand” announcements with Brocade, Cisco, and Juniper point to its continuing progress with virtualization and its Domain 2.0 strategy.
  • The fact that three vendors are supporting the launch and supporting virtual routing on a common platform suggests NFV is beginning to deliver on the promise of vendor agnosticism.
  • It also suggests that vendor messaging needs to evolve and focus on VNF performance vs. availability.

Glen Hunt from our transport and routing team recently wrote an analysis of AT&T’s “Network on Demand” work with Brocade, Cisco and Juniper. It’s a good report. Among other things, it calls out the significance of AT&T delivering virtual network functions (VNFs) from different vendors, out to the enterprise, as a solid proof point of NFV’s vendor agnosticism promised. At the same time, Glen also points out that the first “Universal CPE” being used in the service deployment was custom-built to AT&T specifications by Juniper. On paper, at least, the concepts of “vendor-agnostic” and “custom-built” are contradictory. Read more of this post