How Telecom Benefits from IoT: Life and Death Security Implications

Jason Marcheck

Jason Marcheck

Summary Bullets:

  • Network security is moving from something that has traditionally been seen as being “baked in” to an overt aspect of vendor solution marketing as all IP-based telecom and IoT networks proliferate.
  • As IoT security steps increasingly into the light, telecom network operators and vendors have a chance to win business in a number of vertical markets that have been previously out of their “sweet spot.”

The other day, I was invited to hear Ethernet co-inventor Bob Metcalfe participate in a live stream interview at RCR Wireless’ studios in Austin, TX. During the talk, professor Metcalfe touched on a range of topics including the history of Ethernet development, entrepreneurship and IoT networking requirements. While all good stuff, the part of the interview I found most interesting dealt with IoT security, particularly as it pertains to securing the networks needed to enable driverless cars on a mass-market scale. (For those interested, the gist of the automotive security discussion begins at about 25:30 of the video). Read more of this post

Hardware Disaggregation: Generating Site and Network-Wide Requirements

Rick Talbot

Rick Talbot

Summary Bullets:

  • Network element disaggregation drives an immediate need for open operating systems for the separate elements.
  • The SDN control needs to focus on the end-to-end network rather than the multiple network elements at a site.

In a blog last month (Hardware Disaggregation: Truly SDN-Optimized Network Elements?), I observed that software-defined networking (SDN) can orchestrate the separate traffic forwarding functions – wavelength switching, TDM (SONET/SDH/OTN) switching, packet switching and optical transport – allowing disaggregation of functions previously performed in a single packet-optical switching platform. After noting in a blog earlier this month that demand for this disaggregation exists beyond the theoretical (Hardware Disaggregation: Demand Extending Beyond Expectations), it is now time to consider what is required to provide network element disaggregation (or, in the rest of this blog, simply disaggregation). Read more of this post

For ADTRAN, 200 Reasons Why Gigabit Access Is Relevant

Erik Keith

Erik Keith

Summary Bullets:

  • ADTRAN’s August 2015 announcement highlighting its more than 200 networks supporting Gigabit access speeds demonstrates the growing relevance, and demand, for ultra-broadband fixed access services, despite ongoing skepticism about the need for Gigabit-speed connections.
  • With ADTRAN’s FTTH solutions enabling Gigabit connectivity – primarily for telcos but also for several cable operators – operators will become increasingly compelled to upgrade their networks to respond to competitive pressures, driving additional opportunities for networking equipment vendors.

ADTRAN, while certainly not the largest or most aggressive telecom equipment vendor in the market, has still garnered the rather notable superlative of being the first vendor to claim enabling more than 200 customer networks that offer Gigabit access speeds. While many of ADTRAN’s Gigabit customers are smaller telcos and cable companies in the unique North American market (where there are over 1,200 Tier 2 and Tier 3 service providers), this does not diminish the fact that ADTRAN’s 200-plus Gigabit-enabled communities/networks benchmark is quite an achievement. Read more of this post

TEOCO: Supports the 5G Innovation Center, but Backing Does Not Alter Portfolio Limits

Ron Westfall

Ron Westfall

Summary Bullets:

  • TEOCO unveiled its support for the 5G Innovation Center in a bid to elevate its ecosystem influence in the nascent development of 5G technology, especially with starting gate inclusion of SON capabilities.
  • TEOCO needs to develop or acquire orchestration platforms to ensure it can play a pivotal role in operator adoption of 5G technology, particularly in relation to OSS transformation aspects.

TEOCO’s decision to back the 5G Innovation Center (5GIC), located at the University of Surrey (UK), yielded a sales and marketing opportunity to promote its network planning and optimization portfolio for use and application at the 5GIC. The TEOCO portfolio assets include:

  • Helix, its cloud-based platform designed to provide service assurance with real-time analytics and machine learning;
  • ASSET, its radio planning product which includes small-cell planning; and
  • DIMENSION, developed for end-to-end visualization and capacity planning.

Read more of this post

CTIA Super Mobility Week: Day Three – Was It a Worthwhile Show?

Peter Jarich

Peter Jarich

Summary Bullets:

  • The question of whether or not CTIA’s Super Mobility Week was a successful event is more than just an interesting topic of conversation; it’s an important consideration for any vendor or service provider investing their time (and trade show budget) in it.
  • The answer to the question is “it depends,” with the greatest value coming to anyone who wants to hear from, or message to, major U.S. service providers.

If you’ve read our last few posts about Day Zero, Day One, and Day Two of CTIA’s Super Mobility Week, you already know that we think 5G, IoT and SDN/NFV were the most important themes. Our assessment is hardly unique. Most people we talked with agreed that IoT and 5G (including 5G technologies like virtualization) dominated the trade show floor discussions in Las Vegas. Read more of this post

CTIA Super Mobility Week: Day Two – The IoT Network Wars

Peter Jarich

Peter Jarich

Summary Bullets:

  • Broadly, 5G and IoT technologies were the dominant themes of CTIA’s Super Mobility Week.
  • On the IoT front, network technology evolutions and launches – particularly focused on low-data, long-lived applications – came to the fore.
  • The different approaches to support low-power wide area IoT connectivity come with different time lines and value propositions; a battle is brewing.

CTIA’s Super Mobility Week ran through Friday. But, given a third and final day that was supremely quiet, many people considered the official day two to be the end. In other words, if you’re looking for major takeaways, you probably weren’t surprised past Thursday. Heck, anyone reading my post from last Tuesday probably already figured out the show’s key themes were 5G and IoT. Read more of this post

MEF 2.0 Service Certifications Still Necessary, 55 Service Providers Now Certified

Glenn Hunt

Glenn Hunt

Summary Bullets:

• CE 2.0 certified services form the foundation for “Third Network” connectivity services, enabled by emerging Lifecycle Service Orchestration (LSO), SDN, and NFV technology solutions.

• Some 55 service providers, to date, have earned CE 2.0 service certification, with 16 added in 2015, showing that aside from the march to SDN/NFV utopia, fundamental service delivery remains king.

Using the MEF’s upcoming Gen15 networking event in Dallas as a backdrop, it is obvious that vendors and operators alike continue to see the merits of obtaining CE 2.0 service certification in order to deliver on fundamental Ethernet services. Not only are vendors and operators spending the resources necessary to obtain certification, but they are also actively engaged in the upcoming Gen15 event. During 2015, trials and PoCs involving NFV and SDN are clearly moving to the very real beginnings of deployment – this is where the value of CE 2.0 really begins to shine. Not only can operators continue to offer an industry standard set of Ethernet services (E-LAN, E-Line, E-Tree and E-Access), but now with the added agility that is promised by NFV implementations (e.g., CE 2.0 as a virtual network function [VNF]), and with broad industry cooperation, customers can also expect that these more dynamic services will continue to be interoperable across vendor platforms and across multiple operators.
Read more of this post